Tag Archives: Turkey

Recipe contains turkey.

Sunshine in a Jar (Preserved Lemons, Moroccan Meatballs)

“Be willing to be a beginner every single morning.”Meister Eckhart

Moroccan Meatballs in Sauce
Moroccan Meatballs in Sauce

Ever since I watched Kitty Morse stuff lemons and salt into a jar…

…while she cheerily chatted about life in the Kasbah to the Culinary Historians of San Diego, I’ve been fascinated with  Moroccan cuisine. 

Studying cookbooks like Kitty’s Mint Tea and Minarets and Fatema Hal’s  Authentic Recipes from Morocco, I tried various dishes, getting a sense of characteristic flavors: preserved lemons, harissa (hot chili pepper paste), caraway seeds, pine nuts, mint, tomatoes, coriander seeds, cumin, dried apricots, cinnamon, chilies, olives, ginger. Many of these ingredients I knew from other cuisines, like Mexican or Indian or Greek, but these were new combinations.

My Take on Moroccan Meatballs

Then, when I was planning a holiday party, I made up my own recipe: Moroccan Meatballs. I used ground turkey instead of lamb for a lighter (but definitely not traditional) base, and included a tangy tomato sauce. 

The recipe makes lots of meatballs, which freeze well and then reheat well in the tomato sauce in a slow cooker, keeping them warm and easy.  

Recently I updated my recipe, mainly because the ground turkey I bought came in a different sized pack, so I had to adjust the other ingredients. I also wanted to make it a little spicier, with a new dash of cayenne.

How to Make Preserved Lemons

Although you can buy preserved lemons from some specialty shops (but I can’t remember where I saw them…) or from Amazon (but they are heavy so shipping is expensive and the glass jar makes it risky). The best is making your own preserved lemons, but it does mean you have to think ahead about a month, or always keep a supply on hand. 

Some recipes you’ll find also include adding other seasonings like bay leaf or coriander seeds, but I prefer the simplicity of the traditional, using just the basics:

  • Five or six organic lemons (either Meyers lemons or Eurekas), some more for juicing, if needed
  • At least 1/4 cup sea salt or Kosher salt (without the chemicals of common table salt)

You’ll need a wide-mouthed pint jar and a sharp knife.

  1. Rinse and dry the lemons. Slit them in quarters down to 1/2 inch, without breaking them entirely apart, picking out any seeds that come out easily.
  2. Put a tablespoon of salt in the bottom of the jar. Sprinkle salt liberally within each lemon, then squeeze the quarters together, and place it in the jar.
  3. As you add each lemon, push it down into the jar, squeezing the juice from the one beneath, sprinkling on more salt to draw out the juice. You’ll be surprised how many lemons will find in the jar as they give up their juice, and you keep pressing them down beneath the level of the juice.
  4. It’s very important that the lemons are completely covered with juice to prevent the growth of mold. If needed, add more freshly squeezed lemon juice when the jar is nearly packed, within an inch or so from the top.
  5. Cover and set the jar in a warm place for a couple of days, maybe on your kitchen counter, so that you can shake and turn them over to distribute the salt and juice every day or so.  Label the date you put them up, maybe also with the date a month later when you can start using them. 
  6. When you want to use one, use a spoon or tongs to take it from the jar sanitarily. Give it a quick rinse under cold water to remove excess salt. You can remove the seeds and inside pulp, if you like — it’s the skins you use as the flavoring, sliced or chopped.

The lemons are good for several months on the counter or in your fridge. Just make sure that the liquid fully covers the lemons.

Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Taking Stock (or Broth)

Do whatever brings you to life, then. Follow your own fascinations, obsessions, and compulsions. Trust them. Create whatever causes a revolution in your heart.”  Elizabeth Gilbert, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear

Mini Ravioli in Homemade Stock
Mini Ravioli in Homemade Stock
Homemade Turkey Stock for Freezer
Homemade Turkey Stock for Freezer

 

It’s the deep mid-winter now, just past the solstice (Latin for  “sun stopped, stationery”…

Time to begin again, take stock of what I am doing and where my life is going. And, time to build up a supply of stock in the freezer, especially with the availability of bones and leftovers from big holiday dinners.

Whether you call it “stock” (technically, made from bones) or “broth” (made from meat), homemade stock is  the irreplaceable foundation for sauces, gravies, and soups.

Stockpiling

This year, I made stock from Thanksgiving twice: once on the same day as I roasted the turkey and another when there was little more than the carcass left.

I always feel rich when I have a freezer full of homemade stock — and it’s almost free! — since it takes only the giblets and the bones and whatever meat is left on them, plus a few vegetables and herbs. It just takes a bit of time while you are working on wrapping Christmas presents or relaxing with a book.

My husband, Mark, doesn’t feel the same about a full freezer, since he believes it interferes with good ice production, essential for a wee dram of the “Scottish mineral water.” But, he’s learned to be patient with me, especially since he’s really fond of soup and gravy. This year, he even helped me label and put away all the meal-sized packages I’d made.

Gobble Going Gone

By Tuesday after Thanksgiving, all but the bones and some white turkey meat were left from the Thanksgiving dinner.

Turkey stock pot, ready for water
Turkey stock pot, ready for water

Since most meat is carved off the turkey, lots of bones are available for the stock pot. Then, a big fresh onion, peeled and cut into wedges, along with two or three carrots and stalks of celery, cut into 1-inch chunks.

The stems from fresh parsley, a few sprigs of thyme, a dozen peppercorns (never salt), and a couple of bay leaves complete the basics.

The stock pot is the Valhalla for many  (but not all!)vegetables that didn’t make it to center stage, but still have flavor and nutrients to contribute. I look in the freezer for more parley stems or asparagus trimmings or cilantro that started to wilt (but not smell!).

I look in the refrigerator for ends of celery, or green onions beginning to wilt, green tops of leeks, carrot tops, maybe a half a lemon. I avoid any brassicas — cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, or broccoli – too stinky. I don’t include peppers, either. I’m looking for a green symphony that offers depth, not drama. And, for sure, I do NOT include anything that more properly belongs on the compost heap, instead of the stock pot. The nose knows.

Turkey stock simmering
Turkey stock simmering

It’s a slow simmer in the stock pot for an hour or two, periodically skimming the fat off the top.

Then, I remove it from the heat and let it cool enough to handle and strain it into a large storage container. I look through for any meat, but all the rest that remains in the strainer goes out now. The stock goes into the fridge for overnight and in the morning, I can lift off any remaining fat, and package the stock in smaller containers for the freezer.

Quick Pasta Soup

Last Monday, Mark and I walked over to the Post Office to mail out Christmas packages. The temperature had dipped to the 40s, and by the time we got back home, we were chilly and hungry.

Perfect for a quick soup. I planned to boil up some mini ravioli, finishing with a bit of salt and pepper and fresh parsley. I figured a half hour to for a soothing and light lunch. I dug deep into the freezer for the stock, and found the containers that Mark had labeled for me, along with a laugh. 

Homemade Turkey Stock for Freezer - Free!
Homemade Turkey Stock for Freezer – Free! 

 

Homemade Turkey Stock - Freezer Hostage
Homemade Turkey Stock – Freezer Hostage
Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Turkey Moroccan Meatballs

Moroccan Meatballs with Delicata Squash
Moroccan Meatballs with Delicata Squash

 

This recipe makes 80+ 1-inch Moroccan meatballs, with 6 cups of sauce.

Great for large parties or for freezing family-sized batches for fast and easy mid-week suppers.

 

Ingredients (Onion)Ingredients

For meatballs:
  • 3 pounds ground turkey
  • 1/2 cup (5 oz. by weight) spicy Harissa paste, a traditional Moroccan seasoning, either pre-made from a store or Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Mina-Harissa-Traditional-Moroccan-Pepper/dp/B004U771H4)  or made from a recipe, like this one – http://mideastfood.about.com/od/dipsandsauces/r/harissa.htm or this one – http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/harissa-51185010
  • 1 – 2 preserved lemons, rinsed, and cut into small dice (1/4 inch)
  • 1 cup pine nuts
  • 3/4 cup dried apricots, diced
  • 1 1/2 cup onion, small dice
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 3 Tablespoons dried mint, OR 4 Tablespoons fresh mint, cut small, OR a combination (my favorite) of 1 Tablespoon dried, 3 Tablespoon fresh
  • 2 eggs, well beaten
  • 2 teaspoons salt or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper, or to taste, depending on spiciness of Harissa
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or a quick sprinkle from the jar) – optional
  • 1 Tablespoon caraway seeds
  • 1 1/2 cups panko or homemade breadcrumbs, PLUS 2 cups more for rolling meatballs before baking
For sauce:
  • 1 Tablespoon caraway seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3-12 oz cans organic diced tomatoes
  • 1 – 2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 4 cups organic or homemade turkey or chicken broth
  • 1 Tablespoon honey, or to taste  
  • 1 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of black pepper, or to taste

Preparation (Chef's hat)Preparation

1 – Heat a dry skillet over medium heat, then add pine nuts. Set timer for 3 minutes. Keep stirring and turning pine nuts, lifting the pan, to make sure that they don’t burn. After 3 minutes (or when brown spots begin to appear on nuts), remove the pan from the heat and immediately pour the pine nuts into a bowl to cool.

2 – Preheat oven to 350˚F.

3 – In a large mixing bowl, assemble turkey, harissa, lemon, pine nuts, apricots, onion, garlic, mint, salt, pepper, 1 Tablespoon caraway seeds, cayenne pepper (optional), 1 1/2 cups panko, and beaten eggs.

4 – Pour 2 more cups panko into a separate, shallow bowl.

5 – Wearing food handler’s gloves or using very clean hands, mix all ingredients to combine. Using a 1-inch scoop or a tablespoon measure, form  the mixture into 1-inch meatballs. Roll each meatball in the panko and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment or a silicon mat, allowing about 1 inch between meatballs.

6 – Once one baking sheet is full, put it in a 350˚F oven for 25 minutes, while assembling additional baking sheets of meatballs. Bake one sheet at a time, or extend cooking time to 30 minutes for two-sheet baking, switching the baking sheet positions halfway through baking time.

7 – Remove the baking sheet from the oven, allowing meatballs to cool for five minutes on the sheet. Carefully remove from sheet and cool on a wire rack.

8 – While the meatballs are cooling, make the sauce:

  • Toast spices in a dry 3-quart sauce pan until aromatic (a couple of minutes), then add diced tomatoes, lemon juice, and turkey or chicken broth.
  • Heat to simmer. Add honey and season to taste with salt and pepper. Simmer for 10 minutes or until the sauce has reduced and thickened.

9 – Either cool and freeze, or put in heated sauce for serving immediately or in a slow cooker on Warm setting for holding for up to 3 1/2 hours.

First seen on www.CulinaryOracle.com, Barbara Newton-Holmes, Dec. 16, 2015

Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Discovering Quick Bite Snacks

“Stillness is where creativity and solutions to problems are found.” Eckhart Tolle

Honey roast turkey with fruit quick bites
Honey roast turkey with fruit quick bites

 

 

It was steamy in San Diego last week…

 

 

 

… and several spontaneous Happy Hours were called in Treo: no one felt like cooking or eating too heavily. Something different from cheese and bread and chips. We were looking for something light, and, like stolen kisses, something quick and delicious and surprising.

There wasn’t time to shop or cook. We had to discover it in our fridges and cupboards. Ideally, fine and fresh and ripe (since it would be so simple),  paired or tripled deliciously. Sweet with savory, for instance. Or, sweet with sour. A fling of fresh herb. A drop of reduction. A sprinkling of truffle or fennel salt. We had to play to our internal senses, trying out what we saw.

One night, I had a pack of honey roast turkey (with lots of flavor and no preservatives), some organic fruits: an orange, a green apple, some figs, some dates. These made up to single bites on toothpicks, drizzled with some pomegranate reduction.

On Sunday, Emily discovered an exquisitely ripe cantaloupe. The pale orange, sweet chunks she cut wore jewels of basil chiffonade,  made sweeter still by drops from a lemon grown on her own balcony.

Last night Joe stopped by. I had one sweet potato in the cupboard, which I peeled and cut in 1/4inch sticks. I poured a couple of drops of extra virgin olive oil on a baking sheet, rolled the potato sticks in the oil, and then sprinkled them with truffle salt and truffle oil. Fifteen minutes in a preheated 425˚ F oven, then out and cooling for a few minutes meant they were crispy on the outside and soft inside.

There’s always something for a snack, if you just listen to the Muse.

 

 

Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Turkey Marinara on Spaghetti Squash

4 servings

Onion icon smallIngredients

1 lb. turkey cutlet or filet, cut in 1-in cubes

1/3 cup Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos or Bragg’s Liquid Aminos

3 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3 cloves garlic, minced

1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 teaspoon Italian herbs

3 Tablespoons olive oil + 2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 medium spaghetti squash, rinsed

1/2 cup onion, small dice

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup celery, small dice

1/4 cup carrot, small dice

1/2 cup crimini (or other) mushrooms, sliced

1 – 25oz Organic Tomato Basil Marinara, from Trader Joe’s or comparable

Fresh parsley or basil, for garnish

Chef's hat icon smallerPreparation

1 – Into a Ziplock 1-gallon bag, put: turkey, liquid aminos, lemon juice, garlic, red pepper flakes, Italian herbs, and 3 Tablespoons olive oil. Seal and smoosh around to coat meat. Refrigerate for 1 hour, or (ideally) longer, up to overnight.

2 – Preheat oven to 350˚ F.

3 – Cut spaghetti squash) in half lengthwise. Remove seeds and discard. Ok if some strings left.

4 – In roasting pan or baking dish, add 1 inch or so of water. Place squash cut side down in water. Cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until skin can be punctured easily with a fork. Remove from oven and from water. 

5 – Heat 2 Tablespoons olive oil into heavy kettle over medium high heat. Add onions and salt. Sauté and stir until onions are translucent and softened, about 1 – 2 minutes.

6 – Add celery and carrots, continue stirring, and sauté for another 2 minutes.

7 – Add marinated turkey, with marinade. Stir and sauté for another 5 minutes.

8 – Add mushrooms, stir, and sauté for another minute.

9 – Add marinara sauce, mix well. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 5 minutes.

10 – While sauce is simmering, scrape out the spaghetti squash with a fork.

11 – Serve immediately, marinara over spaghetti squash, garnished with parsley or basil.

Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Turkey Burgers

For 10 servings

Onion icon smallIngredients

1 1/4 lb (that’s 20 oz by weight) lean ground turkey

1/4 cup of tightly packed, small-diced sun-dried tomatoes

12 medium black olives, cut into slices

1 Tablespoon fresh chives, minced

1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced

1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 1/2 teaspoon salt

3 Tablespoons HP Sauce (from UK, found at World Market) or 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce (but not as fruity and more runny than HP Sauce)

1 cup almond meal (found at Trader Joe’s)

1 large egg beaten

1 more cup almond meal in a shallow bowl for coating burgers

1 Tablespoon olive oil (or a little more for several burgers)

Chef's hat icon smallerPreparation

1 – Combine all ingredients (except for last 2 in the list) in a large bowl: turkey, tomatoes, olives, chives, rosemary, red pepper flakes, salt, HP Sauce, 1 cup almond meal, and beaten egg.

2 – Mix well with a rubber spatula or by hand (best to wear food-grade gloves).

3 – Divide and shape into ten 3 oz burgers.

4 – Put 1 cup almond meal in a shallow bowl.

5 – Carefully dip each burger into the almond meal on both sides, then align on a parchment-line baking sheet.

6 – When baking sheet is full of burgers, cover with another piece of parchment.

7 – Seal entire pan with plastic wrap and freeze on sheets for 12 hours. For convenience, put burgers into freezer bags and keep frozen for up to a month.

8 – Cook from frozen by heating 1 Tablespoon of olive oil in a frying pan on medium high heat until it shimmers (about a minute or so).

9 – Turn down heat to medium low, place the frozen burger in the frying pan, and cover. Cook for 5 minutes, checking halfway through to be sure that the almond coating is not burning. If it is browning too fast, turn the heat to low.

10 – Turn over the burger and cook for another 5 minutes or until instant-read thermometer registers at least 165˚F.

11 – Remove from heat. Let rest a minute or so while you prepare the rest of the plate.

Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Ground Turkey

Onion icon smallIngredients

For 4 servings

For the roasted acorn squash:

1 large acorn squash, cut lengthwise into quarters, seeds removed

2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

4 grinds freshly ground black pepper

For the stuffing:

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup onion, small dice

3/4 pound ground turkey

1 Tablespoon garlic granules

1/2 cup parsnips, small dice

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped finely

1 Tablespoon preserved lemon (1/4 of a lemon) OR 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest

2 Tablespoon sun-dried tomatoes, small dice

1 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/2 cup organic chicken stock

Chef's hat icon smallerPreparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375˚F.
  2. Brush acorn squash quarters with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place cut-side up on a baking sheet and roast for 1 hour, or until very soft and a bit browned.
  3. While acorn squash is roasting, prepare the stuffing by first heating the olive oil to shimmering in a large skillet over medium high heat.
  4. Add onions and salt. Sauté for 2 minutes to soften.
  5. Add the ground turkey in small, bite-sized pieces. Sprinkle with garlic granules and sauté and stir, breaking up larger pieces, for 4-5 minutes, or until no longer pink.
  6. Add the parsnips, fennel seeds, thyme, lemon or zest, tomatoes, and paprika. Sauté and stir for another 2 minutes.
  7. Add the chicken stock and stir. Cover for 2 minute, then remove the cover and cook for another 1 or 2 minutes to reduce the the liquid.
  8. When cooked, remove the squash from the oven. Place each quarter of the roasted acorn into a shallow soup bowl. Cover half the squash with 1/4 of the stuffing, and serve immediately.
Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Many Bean, Many Pepper Turkey Chile

Many servings, enough for a party

Ingredients

For meat and marinade:

1 lb. turkey filet or cutlet, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1/3 cup Bragg’s Liquid Aminos

1 teaspoon ground chipotle chile pepper

1 teaspoon ground ancho chile pepper

1  teaspoon ground chile powder

2-3 tablespoons olive oil

For sauce and beans:

1 large onion, medium dice

1 teaspoon salt

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 jalapeño, small dice

1 green bell pepper, medium dice

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1-15 oz can organic red kidney beans, rinsed and drained

1-15 oz can organic black-eyed peas or white kidney beans, rinsed and drained

1-15 oz can organic pinto beans, rinsed and drained

1-15 oz can organic Great Northern or garbanzo beans

1 generous cup organic sweet corn (frozen is easy and quick to thaw)

1-15 oz can organic diced tomatoes

3 cups organic chicken stock

1 – 2 teaspoons dried oregano

1 – 2 tablespoons lime or lemon juice

For garnish:

1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped roughly

1 small white onion or 1 bunch green onion, chopped small dice

Lime wedges

Preparation

1- Put cubed turkey and marinade into a 1-gal Ziplock bag and smoosh it around to coat the meat. Refrigerate in the fridge for at least an hour or (best) overnight.

2- Sauté onion and salt in olive oil on medium high heat until soft, about a minute, then add garlic and green pepper, cumin and coriander, and jalapeño. Sauté for another minute or two.

3- Add marinated meat, sautéing and stirring with vegetables until well coated and brown — about 3-4 minutes.

4- Add all beans and corn, plus tomatoes, stirring well.

5- Add stock and oregano. Keep stirring.

6- Bring to a boil.

7- Taste. Add up to 1/4 teaspoon more coriander, cumin, oregano, salt to adjust seasoning.

8- Lower heat, cover, and simmer for 45 minutes.

9- Taste. Add lime/lemon juice. If needed, add a smidge more salt, ancho chile pepper, chipotle chile pepper. Stir and simmer for another 5 minutes.

10- Serve with chopped fresh cilantro, chopped onions, and lime wedges.

Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Burger – Cooked!

Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Burger - Gluten-Free
Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Burger – Gluten

It’s nighttime now (instead of early morning), after the first full business day of 2015. It’s been a long and busy day, probably for you as well as for me.

For my friend Lisa and everyone else, here’s a picture of the Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Burger, cooked, this time — our 12-minute dinner tonight, cooked and rested just as described below. It works and it’s easy and moist and flavorful. Thanks for the inspiration!

I’m going to be slowing the pace a bit for the next month or so while I work on my website. I’ll still be sending out emails, but just not daily.

I need a little time (like roasted meat) to let the juices recirculate and get ready for a spring launch of my website, where you will find it easier to comment and ask questions and find copies of previous emails.

I’ll still be thinking of you, and writing and cooking…but you just won’t know for sure when there will be another email from me in your In box. It’s a surprise.

Have a beautiful and delicious day! - Barbara
Have a beautiful and delicious day! – Barbara
Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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Almond Believer

“When an almond tree became covered with blossoms in the heart of winter, all the trees around it began to jeer. ‘What vanity,’ they screamed, ‘what insolence! Just think, it believes it can bring spring in this way!’

The flowers of the almond tree blushed for shame. ‘Forgive me, my sisters,’ said the tree. ‘I swear I did not want to blossom, but suddenly I felt a warm springtime breeze in my heart.” Nikos Kazantzakis, St. Francis

Turkey Burger Ingredients
Turkey Burger Ingredients

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve been looking for a way of making truly gluten-free meatballs, meatloaf, and burgers. I know that per bite there isn’t much gluten in the panko that I use in my standard recipes, but I know that some people need to be strict. Sometimes, it’s good to have a complete break from it. And besides, it’s a good culinary challenge.

So, the other day it occurred to me that I might try almond meal (easily available at Trader Joe’s). It’s not as absorbent as panko or homemade breadcrumbs, but, combined with the protein of a beaten egg, might just be good enough.

Besides, I figured if I froze the burgers, then cooked them slowly, they’d hold together well enough. (That’s a trick used when making crab cakes, but that’s another story…)

So, what we have here are gluten-free, lactose-free, light-on-the-fat-calories — but moist and flavorful — turkey burgers.

Besides, it makes a bunch for a crowd (economical) or for pulling out of the freezer one by one for a quick weekday meal.

Onion icon smallIngredients

  • 1 1/4 lb (that’s 20oz by weight) lean ground turkey
  • 1/4 cup of tightly packed, small-diced sun-dried tomatoes
  • 12 medium black olives, cut into slices
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh chives, minced
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced
  • 1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 Tablespoons HP Sauce (from UK, found at World Market) or 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce (but not as fruity and more runny than HP Sauce)
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • 1 more cup almost meal in a shallow bowl for coating burgers

Chef's hat icon smallerPreparation

  1. Combine all ingredients (except for last 2 in the list) in a large bowl: turkey, tomatoes, olives, chives, rosemary, red pepper flakes, salt, HP Sauce, 1 cup almond meal, and beaten egg.
  2. Mix well with a rubber spatula or by hand (best to wear food-grade gloves).
  3. Divide and shape into ten 3 oz burgers.
  4. Put 1 cup almond meal in a shallow bowl.
  5. Carefully dip each burger into the almond meal on both sides, then align on a parchment-line baking sheet.
  6. When baking sheet is full of burgers, cover with another piece of parchment.
  7. Seal entire pan with plastic wrap and freeze on sheets for 12 hours. For convenience, put burgers into freezer bags and keep frozen for up to a month.
  8. Cook from frozen by heating 1 Tablespoon of olive oil in a frying pan on medium high heat until it shimmers (about a minute or so).
  9. Turn down heat to medium low, place the frozen burger in the frying pan, and cover.
  10. Cook for 5 minutes, checking halfway through to be sure that the almond coating is not burning. If it is browning too fast, turn the heat to low.
  11. Turn over the burger and cook for another 5 minutes or until instant- read thermometer registers at least 165 ̊F.
  12. Remove from heat. Let rest a minute or so while you prepare the rest of the plate.
Have a beautiful and delicious day! - Barbara
Have a beautiful and delicious day! – Barbara
Questions? Contact barbara@CulinaryOracle.com
©2017 Barbara Newton-Holmes
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